Courtyard Curses

installation in the indoor garden of an abandoned army hospital, part of the exhibition “Traces”.  Both shrines are composed of natural material found within the enclosed walls of the courtyard.DSC_0153DSC_0156DSC_0169_2

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installation in an abandoned army hospital, part of the exhibition “Traces”. Composed of metal, nails and wax candles, donated by the local monastery of Dendermonde.

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Haystack

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Spread all over, Haystacks form the landscape of the Romanian countryside. Over the centuries, this traditional method of gathering and preserving hay has has developed to the point where the haystacks of Roumania have their own characteristics. Haystacks like this are found nowhere else on earth. The hay plays an important role in the areas where people live almost completely self-sustainable. It is the nutrition on which the animals survive, and it serves as a trade currency. Impressed by the cultural dimensions of these  sculptures, the idea came up to develop a new kind of haystack, one which breaks with the traditional, conventional form. A reversed one

Following the traditional method, the process of building the haystack went trough different stages. From cutting fresh meter-high grass with a traditional scythe, drying it by flipping it over several times over a few days, cutting wood, constructing the frame, and eventually placing the hay.

The result is a flipped haystack, which arose interest and curiosity from neighbouring farmers, even to the point they were they were asking if it was an innovative and better method for stacking the hay.

The installation was part of the project “Carpathian Downhill”, a residency project in the forest of Transylvania, Roumania. The aim of the project was to generate a contemporary vision on land art. Trough out these 2 weeks, several individual and collaborated works were created.

Bed

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Installation during the project “Carpathian Downhill”, a residency project in the forest of Transylvania, Roumania. The aim of the project was to generate a contemporary vision on land art. Trough out these 2 weeks, several individual and collaborated works were created.

The Bed for contemplation offers a place for relaxation and contemplation. It invites to lay down with the head on a pillow, which is placed right under a spear-pointed rock, kept in place by the principle of gravity.

Circle for Sungazing

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Instalation during the project “Carpathian Downhill”, a residency project in the forest of Transilvania, Romania. The aim of the project was to generate a contemporary vision on land art. Troughout these 2 weeks, several individual and colaborated works were created.

The Circle for Sungazing is a minimal intervention in the landscape, by creating a point from which one can practice the ancient technique of sungazing. Sungazing is a technique practiced by several ancient cultures and refers to the act of looking directly in the sun. By this way, it is believed one can absorb energy and vitamins from the sunlight. To graduadly develop this ability, practice takes place on the moment of sunrise or sunset.