Curation of DOLERS, land art around the city

In an era where progress manifests itself faster than ever, it’s hard to keep up. How do we relate to a landscape that is constantly changing? Is it still possible to find shelter against the noise of this time? Can nature still offer us peace when every square meter of fragmented green is managed? Is there space left to wander around, discover or get lost now that every step we make is digitally registered? Or could it be that this new situation is just a lot for us offers hidden possibilities and perspectives?

Questions that have occupied to me as a person and artist for a long time and which ultimately formed the common thread for Dolers: a search for what our contemporary landscape – both natural and urban – has to offer. A search for how this landscape can become a medium for creation and an attempt to deepen our understanding of it.

In this search, 18 artists from different countries, with different backgrounds and skilled in divers disciplines, crossed the riverlandscape around the Flemish city of Dendermonde.

The following publication is a registration and shows snapshots of very temporary to more permanent interventions. Some of them only existed only a few moments, hours, days or weeks, while others took months to open themselves to their full glory.

The result offers no answers, on the contrary. It is a reminder for ourself that the most ingenious creation takes place in front of us: nature itself. We don’t need much to create, everything is already there. Dolers is therefore an ode to the hidden potential that lies in everything. Both around us and in ourselves.

Digital catalogue: VM_dolers Lay LR._v1

 

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Haystack

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Spread all over, Haystacks form the landscape of the Romanian countryside. Over the centuries, this traditional method of gathering and preserving hay has has developed to the point where the haystacks of Roumania have their own characteristics. Haystacks like this are found nowhere else on earth. The hay plays an important role in the areas where people live almost completely self-sustainable. It is the nutrition on which the animals survive, and it serves as a trade currency. Impressed by the cultural dimensions of these  sculptures, the idea came up to develop a new kind of haystack, one which breaks with the traditional, conventional form. A reversed one

Following the traditional method, the process of building the haystack went trough different stages. From cutting fresh meter-high grass with a traditional scythe, drying it by flipping it over several times over a few days, cutting wood, constructing the frame, and eventually placing the hay.

The result is a flipped haystack, which arose interest and curiosity from neighbouring farmers, even to the point they were they were asking if it was an innovative and better method for stacking the hay.

The installation was part of the project “Carpathian Downhill”, a residency project in the forest of Transylvania, Roumania. The aim of the project was to generate a contemporary vision on land art. Trough out these 2 weeks, several individual and collaborated works were created.

Bed

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Installation during the project “Carpathian Downhill”, a residency project in the forest of Transylvania, Roumania. The aim of the project was to generate a contemporary vision on land art. Trough out these 2 weeks, several individual and collaborated works were created.

The Bed for contemplation offers a place for relaxation and contemplation. It invites to lay down with the head on a pillow, which is placed right under a spear-pointed rock, kept in place by the principle of gravity.

Circle for Sungazing

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Instalation during the project “Carpathian Downhill”, a residency project in the forest of Transilvania, Romania. The aim of the project was to generate a contemporary vision on land art. Troughout these 2 weeks, several individual and colaborated works were created.

The Circle for Sungazing is a minimal intervention in the landscape, by creating a point from which one can practice the ancient technique of sungazing. Sungazing is a technique practiced by several ancient cultures and refers to the act of looking directly in the sun. By this way, it is believed one can absorb energy and vitamins from the sunlight. To graduadly develop this ability, practice takes place on the moment of sunrise or sunset.